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Posts Tagged ‘Todd Norian’

Making Dots

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

I just spent a glorious weekend in Watertown reconnecting with three dynamic women over a reunion weekend to celebrate a friendship birthed 10 years ago during a 200-hour yoga teacher training. Time is sneaky like that—it has the gift of revealing foundations that we don’t even realize we’re creating. Ten years ago, I lived in Northampton. Having already completed a 200-hour training, I knew the craziness and cost of commuting once a month for a year, and so at the end of the first weekend, I offered my tiny apartment as a sleep option for someone. I received an email a few days later from a woman in Watertown taking me up on my request. I told her to bring an air mattress and that I would connect with her and guide her to my place the next month. Unbeknownst to me, she invited another woman to join her (she had a queen-sized air mattress and figured they could share it). Unbeknownst to her, I met a woman from our training at another workshop during the month off and invited her to stay (I had a full bed so figured there’d be plenty of room).

Come the next month, there the four of us were negotiating the real estate of Northampton’s super tiniest attic apartment. It was awkward, funny, tiring, invigorating, silly, soulful, triggering, and wordless. It was as much a part of the yoga training as the classes we attended—I mean let’s face it, yoga is relationship and the crowded quarters were certainly teaching us how to be in open, honest, patient, and compassionate relationship.

It’s been 10 years, and the surge of joy and gratitude I felt seeing these three women all together again was—Hell Yeah Great!!! It was like Christmas Eve on steroids, the fourth of July sky on replay, the flourish of flowers that pop across the New England landscape after a long, stark winter. It was pure Yum.

As we (literally) basked in each others company, caught up, and rambled around Watertown and Cambridge, I found myself thinking of making dots. Last year, post Steve Jobs’ parting, a video of his Stanford University Graduation speech went viral (so worth 15 minutes of your time). In listening to it a handful of times, one part in particular remained embedded in my mental framework. Jobs was talking about dropping out of college but remaining on the campus. He dabbled here and there, and then stumbled upon a calligraphy course. This course fascinated him though at the time it had no relevance in his life—he was just pursuing his Curiosity. In retrospect, post-Mac creation, he realized that the course is what influenced the expansive font offerings that distinguished Macs from PC’s. He called this “making dots”—that our role in life is to pursue that which interests us without attachment or even understanding as to where this might be leading us. Only in retrospect are we able to look back and see how the dots connect. In the moment, we can rest in knowing that we are ‘making dots.’ As I romped with these lovely ladies this weekend I thought—damn—we were making dots during that training—we were making some darn good dots. I drove home on Sunday full to over flowing, grinning broadly, and thinking, “I wanna make more dots! Dot’s rock” I’m getting a t-shirt made: Makin’ Dots! This is my new life motto.

This blog post is courtesy of my dear friend, Kellie Finn – we had the most amazing weekend together basking in the Unlimited connection we four created so many years ago! Now, let’s get to Making Dots.

Photo of Michele George, Kellie Finn and Todd Norian.

 

Hug the Midline

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Las VegasIn Anusara, hug the midline is one way to reference holding onto your joy.  Well, kinda.  

We live in a Universe of vibration.  When we hug the midline, that imaginary line that bifurcates the body into front/back and right/left – we are more in line with our center.  We can connect more to the Source of energy. Out of the midline, we lose connection.  Energy dissipates – we feel a slower vibration.  We feel tired. We react versus respond to Life.

We can’t choose not to have challenges but we can choose how we react.  Two people are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. One goes home, is the victim, lives a very limited and sad life. The other gives a motivational talk, like Randy Pausch, a college professor who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer that led to The Last Lecture.  Why the difference?  (more…)